2019 Guild School

June 8-14, 2019     Maine Maritime Academy, Castine, Maine

12 Hour Classes

Pete Acquisto - Punch Strainer, circa 1740
Diane Almeyda - Enamel and Silver Flowers in a Bottle
Bonni Backe - Caned Bench
Bonni Backe - Step Basket
Bonni Backe - Sailor’s Knot Board
Pia Becker - Dandelions
Pia Becker - Hydrangeas
Pia Becker - Phalaenopsis Orchid
Valeria Bonomi - Converse All Star Sneakers and Baseball Cap
Valeria Bonomi - Handbag, Matching Wallet and Eyeglasses
Iulia Chin Lee - Bi-Color Vase
Pete & Pam Boorum - Wooden Wheelbarrow and Garden Tools
Ursula Dyrbye-Skovsted - Arts and Crafts Stool/Side Table
Annelle Ferguson - Seat Cover for a Chippendale Settee
Daniela Kiefhaber - Tiny Dolls’ Dolls
Daniela Kiefhaber - Glove Making in Miniature
Daniela Kiefhaber - Adventures in Silver Clay
Hiroyuki & Kyoko Kimura - Chocolate Vine (akebi)
Iulia Chin Lee - Nesting Bowls
Deb Mackie - Tooled Leather Rocking Chair
Chris Malcomson - Victorian Sewing Box, circa 1860
Marcia McClain - Double Window Treatment
Cristina Minischetti - Drinks and Appetizers
Cristina Minischetti - Birthday Party
Mary Grady O’Brien - Hanging Decorated Spice Box
Pat Richards - Bergere Hat with Trim and Storage Box
Kim Stewart - Wicker Arm Chair
Lidi Stroud - Woven Bottle

Acquisto

INSTRUCTOR: Pete Acquisto, Fellow
COURSE: Silversmithing and Machine Work
PROJECT: Punch Strainer, circa 1740

This should be a great class with a very cool piece to take home. Students will use a dividing head on the mill to accomplish a complex pattern of holes in the strainer with ease. The pattern will be simplified from the photo but will be very impressive. The dividing heads make it easy to create a perfect pattern with a minimum of measuring. Students will use a jeweler’s saw to cut the handles to shape. They will learn how to use a flex shaft machine to refine the shape of the handles. Hand files will be used to refine the handles further. Students will learn basic soldering by practicing with scrap silver before soldering the handles to the strainer bowl. The last step will be to polish using the flex shaft with the polishing wheels and then the buffing machine for the final polish. Students will be amazed at what they can do.

time: 12 hours. This class will be fun and informative. Students will have time to finish the piece in the time allotted. There will also be plenty of silver available for those who finish early and want to make something else or just practice skills. Students should walk away with a nice punch strainer.

POWER TOOLS: flex shaft, lathe, buffing machine

SKILL LEVEL: Beginner and intermediate. This class is designed for the person with no experience and who wants to learn to operate the equipment necessary in silversmithing. However, more intermediate students who have had silversmithing or machine experience will find this class to be a perfect opportunity to learn new ways of working with silver while refining and perfecting existing skills.

MATERIALS FEE: $80 to be collected at school

Almeyda

INSTRUCTOR: Diane Almeyda, Artisan
COURSE: Enameling
PROJECT: Enamel and Silver Flowers in a Bottle

Flowers add warmth and welcome to any environment. This small bunch of enameled flowers in a milk jug vase, will delight visitors to your cozy kitchen, porch, patio or living room. Flowers will be formed and enameled while leaves will be soldered to a wire and then enameled. Centers can be enameled or small “gems” can be glued to make them look like the Faberge enamels of the past. Students will then artfully arranged them to their taste. Learn enameling basics and soldering with a torch in this fun, relaxed class.

time: 12 hours. Completion is likely.

POWER TOOLS: none

SKILL LEVEL: Beginner and intermediate

MATERIALS FEE: $35 to be collected in advance of school

Backe

INSTRUCTOR: Bonni Backe, Fellow
COURSE: Caning
PROJECT: Caned Bench

Whether in a hall for seating to enable putting on boots and shoes or in front of a piano, this bench is an essential for any home. This piece works for any time period, from Shaker style to the present. This is a class on caning, therefore the bench, built for this class by Pam Boorum, will be provided to the students—no woodworking required. Caning will be done in cotton thread. A special needle that is unlikely to become unthreaded will be used. Students will be provided with a description of how to cane odd shapes, like round and flared squares, for future projects.

time: 12 hours. Completion is likely.

POWER TOOLS: none

SKILL LEVEL: All levels

MATERIALS FEE: $33 to be collected at school

Backe

INSTRUCTOR: Bonni Backe, Fellow
COURSE: Basketry
PROJECT: Step Basket

When used on a step, for as-you-go, or just for decoration, every modern home needs a step basket. Made of 1/16" and 1/32" ash splint on a solid form, this basket is a joy to make. The basket is finished with a lashed rim with a cord between the two rims to hide the uprights. When completed it may be filled with flowers or whatever the student chooses. This is based on a full-sized basket owned by the instructor.

time: 12 hours. Completion is likely.

POWER TOOLS: none

SKILL LEVEL: All levels

MATERIALS FEE: $30 to be collected at school

Backe

INSTRUCTOR: Bonni Backe, Fellow
COURSE: Knot Tying
PROJECT: Sailor’s Knot Board

In the days of sailing ships, sailors had to be rope-tying experts for the safety of the ship and crew could depend upon whether a knot was correctly tied. On a fully rigged ship, several miles of rigging incorporated thousands of knots. There was a different knot for every chore, from the simple hitch to the most ornate Turk’s Head. Tying knots became a craft in itself carried out during long months at sea. Knot boards served as useful training references as well as objects of pride. (The Maine Maritime Academy has at least one for display.)

This knot board has a quarter-sawn lacquered cherry base with up to 20 knots tied with a vintage 3-ply linen cord. Each knot will be mounted on the base above a brass plaque that in a larger scale would have the name of the knot engraved on it. The final touch is a “rope” border around the perimeter. Students will be supplied with instructions for all 20 knots and the tools to enable them to meet the challenge of tying them.

time: 12 hours. Depending on the number of knots chosen, it is likely that this project will be completed by the end of the school week if students work overtime on their own outside of the classroom.

POWER TOOLS: none

SKILL LEVEL: All levels

MATERIALS FEE: $30 to be collected at school

Becker

INSTRUCTOR: Pia Becker, Fellow
COURSE: Flower and Plant Making
PROJECT: Dandelions

Ready for some weeds in your garden? Let’s go! This class will teach students the basic yellow dandelion, including hand cutting the leaves and assembling everything in a botanically correct way. A small box will be provided to “plant” their dandelions made during class, but they can easily be removed to go into a dollhouse garden.

time: 12 hours. Completion is likely.

POWER TOOLS: none

SKILL LEVEL: All levels

MATERIALS FEE: $20 to be collected at school

Becker

INSTRUCTOR: Pia Becker, Fellow
COURSE: Flower Making
PROJECT: Hydrangeas

Hydrangeas come in so many different colors, it’s always a joy to look at them! That’s why this class will teach students how to make those beautiful balls. Cutting punched petals to the required shape will also be taught as well as hand-cutting the leaves and assembling everything on tiny stems. Students are free in choice of color and whether they want to make a whole plant or only some stems for a vase or bouquet. They can either bring their own containers or purchase one from a variety brought by the instructor.

time: 12 hours. Completion is likely if students work overtime on their own outside of the classroom.

POWER TOOLS: none

SKILL LEVEL: Intermediate and advanced

MATERIALS FEE: $20 to be collected at school. If students don’t want to bring their own pots or vases, there will be the option to purchase high quality pots ranging from $5–$20.

Becker

INSTRUCTOR: Pia Becker, Fellow
COURSE: Flower Making
PROJECT: Phalaenopsis Orchid

Orchids are also known as the ”queens among flowers.” In this class students will learn how to cut the blossoms and leaves by hand from paper and assemble them in a botanically correct way, including already withering ones. Closed buds will be made with an air drying clay. Students don’t have to stick to the color of the prototype but may choose their own preference. A small mossy pot is included in the class fee, however students can also bring their own planters if they want.

time: 12 hours. Completion is likely.

POWER TOOLS: none

SKILL LEVEL: Intermediate and advanced

MATERIALS FEE: $25 to be collected at school

Boromini

INSTRUCTOR: Valeria Bonomi, Artisan
COURSE: Textiles
PROJECT: Converse All Star Sneakers and Baseball Cap

Students will build a pair of Converse sneakers, detailed and wearable for dolls. They will also make the shoe box, a shopping bag and a matching baseball cap. Students can choose their favorite fabric for the project and, eventually, learn the techniques for making them look used and aged.

time: 12 hours. Completion is likely.

POWER TOOLS: None.

SKILL LEVEL: Intermediate

MATERIALS FEE: $25 to be collected at school

Boromini

INSTRUCTOR: Valeria Bonomi, Artisan
COURSE: Leather Crafting/Mixed Media
PROJECT: Handbag, Matching Wallet and Eyeglasses

Students will make a Michael Kors style, openable purse with a pocket and metal details. They will also make a matching wallet with money and credit cards inside. Students will learn how to work with very thin leather and can choose their favorite color for the project. The third item students will create is a pair of metal frame eyeglasses with clear lenses. They will learn how to use a UV rays catalyzed resin for the eyeglass lenses. Finally, they will complete this project by making shopping bags and boxes.

time: 12 hours. Completion is likely.

POWER TOOLS: None.

SKILL LEVEL: Intermediate

MATERIALS FEE: $30 to be collected at school

Boorum

INSTRUCTOR: Pete & Pam Boorum, Artisans
COURSE: Woodworking
PROJECT: Wooden Wheelbarrow and Garden Tools

Flats of flowers and vegetables to plant in your garden? Bales of peat moss? Bags of mulch? Perhaps the harvest of vegetables to move to the farm stand? The wheelbarrow may be just what you need. This wooden Amish wheelbarrow is a classic design that is still produced today.

Students will start by making the wheel (although not reinventing it). Duplicate turning and table saw work will follow, along with jeweler’s sawing. Painting allows for the student’s own color choice, as well as distressing and an aging wash, if desired. A selection of garden tools can be made to accompany the wheelbarrow.

time: 12 hours. Completion is likely.

POWER TOOLS: table saw, lathe, drill press, shaper

SKILL LEVEL: Beginner and intermediate

MATERIALS FEE: $35 to be collected at school

INSTRUCTOR: Ursula Dyrbye-Skovsted, Artisan
COURSE: Woodworking/Marquetry
PROJECT: Arts and Crafts Stool/Side Table

This is a fine example of Arts and Crafts and Art Nouveau marquetry furniture that was made with inspiration from different cultures and from nature. This one is inspired by Moorish or Middle Eastern stools or coffee tables and the decor is the from nature. Some are lidded to work as a box. They were meant to be small sewing stools, side tables or even paper baskets. During the start of the last century, decoration became very popular. Pyrographic designs, carvings, paintings and, what this class is all about, marquetry!

Marquetry is different from inlay, where thin wood is shaped and cut into solid wood. With the industrial revolution the century before, manufacturing of thin veneer in a large scale became possible and that lowered the price of exotic wood so as to be accessible to ordinary craftsmen. Marquetry, where the thin veneer is cut and assembled as a jigsaw puzzle forming a thin sheet and then glued to the object, became very popular. The technique in this class is an adaptation between marquetry and inlay that works well in miniature.

With a premade (by the instructor) stool kit students will jump straight to the marquetry decor. From a selection of patterns students will choose their favorite. From different exotic veneers students will make “sandwiches” and cut all parts of the pattern with a jeweler’s saw. Then each veneer piece is inserted in the veneered wood parts of the stool according to the pattern, using a knife and chisels. A wonderful, exciting puzzle, fit for a true miniaturist! And bit by bit the decor is built up. The colorful finished stool is glued, sanded and lacquered! If time permits, there will be an option to hinge the top as a lid. Ready for a journey back to the early 20th century?

time: 12 hours. Completion is likely.

POWER TOOLS: table saw, drill press

SKILL LEVEL: Beginner and intermediate

MATERIALS FEE: $75 to be collected at school

INSTRUCTOR: Annelle Ferguson, Fellow
COURSE: Needlepoint
PROJECT: Seat Cover for a Chippendale Settee

In the 18th century, American needlework was often considered a valuable household possession. For the women of that period, fancy needlework was considered an accomplishment and demonstrated her expertise by embroidering functional items for their home. At times, furniture was commissioned especially to display fine needlework.

Settees were furniture pieces in which two or three chair backs were blended into a single seat. Colonial double chair back style settees were rare and possibly not produced in significant numbers. Following the British custom, American settees were often part of a set with other side chairs. Frequently, canvas work was applied to the furniture pieces with designs that were currently in fashion. Quite often, the patterns for seating were inspired by the love the English had for their gardens. 

Referring to a picture of the original seat cushion, students will sketch and chart a pattern on graph paper, followed by needlepointing that design on #56 silk gauze with Gutermann silk threads. Class discussions will include the essentials for setting up the project and the selection of thread colors, plus adapting original needlework designs into 1/12 scale. A partial chart of the prototype will be available for those not wanting to design their own pattern. In addition, pictures of 18th century floral needlework will be available to use as inspiration if students wish to create their own design.

As an option, the needlepoint seat cover may be upholstered on a Chippendale settee created especially for this class by Mark Murphy. The settee, made of cherry, will have extensive piercing on the back splat and typical Chippendale straight legs with connecting stretchers.

time: 12 hours. Completion is unlikely. Although the chart will be completed by the week’s end, students will be given all the instructions and materials to finish the project at home.

POWER TOOLS: none

SKILL LEVEL: Intermediate and advanced. Magnification and additional lighting is highly recommended. Students should be experienced with basic needlepoint and feel comfortable working on #56 silk gauze.

MATERIALS FEE: $25 to be collected at school. Optional fee for the Chippendale settee is $295.

INSTRUCTOR: Daniela Kiefhaber, Artisan
COURSE: Woodworking
PROJECT: Tiny Dolls’ Dolls

Wooden dolls are one of the oldest dolls found. They were discovered in ancient Egyptian tombs that date from 2000 BC. Peg wooden dolls appeared in Germany and the Netherlands from the 16th century on. In the 19th century the Grodnertal in Italy the best-known product was the peg wooden doll which was popular all over Europe and America. Through the 18th and 19th centuries, wood was increasingly combined with other materials, such as leather, wax and porcelain and the bodies made more articulate. The Hitty doll is a wooden doll that became the protagonist of a children’s book in 1929. Hitty became beloved by all from that time to this.

Students will carve and saw tiny doll’s doll parts from various sorts of wood. The students will receive blank Porcelain heads for the Parian dolls, which they will paint, but all other parts will be made from scratch.

time: 12 hours. Completion is likely.

POWER TOOLS: moto tool

SKILL LEVEL: Beginner and intermediate

MATERIALS FEE: $40 to be collected at school

INSTRUCTOR: Daniela Kiefhaber, Artisan
COURSE: Needlework
PROJECT: Glove Making in Miniature

Starting as early as in the Medieval era, gloves were an indicator of a person’s social and economic status, so nothing but the best quality would do. The fashion gloves worn by the upper classes were crafted of finer leathers such as doeskin and kid (lamb). These gloves would be beautifully fringed and edged, richly embroidered and worked with gold thread or colorful silk threads, and some were adorned with precious stones. By the end of the 17th century the gloves were necessary with clothes. Silk, thin leather, lace, pearls, jewelry and golden buttons were used to make the gloves. Men and women wore embroidered gloves. Gloves with sumptuously embroidered gauntlets were an ideal and a much appreciated complement to the flamboyant dress of the early 17th century. Both visually appealing and symbolically significant, they were presented as precious gifts to distinguished visitors, patrons or friends on festive occasions.

Students will create their own choice of gloves. First they will choose their design, and then work on the less or more elaborate embroidery on silk or directly on the leather. After finishing the embroidery the leather parts will be cut out and put together in a way a real-size glove is constructed. After that the glove will receive some decoration with laces, ribbons and beads. If the embroidery is very elaborate, students might have to work overtime or finish at home, with only one glove fully finished in school.

time: 12 hours. Completion is likely if students work overtime on their own outside of the classroom.

POWER TOOLS: None

SKILL LEVEL: All levels

MATERIALS FEE: $35 to be collected at school

INSTRUCTOR: Daniela Kiefhaber, Artisan
COURSE: Sculpting
PROJECT: Adventures in Silver Clay

This class is ideal for students if they ever wanted to try the possibilities of the new medium silver clay for miniatures. They can let their imagination run wild—from frames to bowls to teapots—everything is possible!

When the silver clay is taken out of the package, it is a slightly moist lump of clay. The clay is then molded into its desired shape and dried. Once the piece is completely dry, it can then be filed, carved and sanded; after which it is fired with a kiln. Once completely fired, the remaining piece is composed of 99.9% pure silver.

The students will be encouraged to develop and work on their own pieces. They will also learn how to combine readymade pottery with silver parts (pictured—the lids). They will have the opportunity to use ready-made molds as well as to learn how to make their own. Creating with metal clay is always an adventure! All projects will be finished during class.

time: 12 hours. Completion is likely.

POWER TOOLS: moto tool

SKILL LEVEL: All levels

MATERIALS FEE: $65 to be collected at school (note: silver clay is quite expensive)

INSTRUCTOR: Hiroyuki & Kyoko Kimura, Fellows
COURSE: Plant Making
PROJECT: Chocolate Vine (akebi)

Students will create a chocolate vine and the board it rests on. They will learn techniques to make a plant with a vine and a “wooden” board from clay. The leaves are made from resin clay which is pressed very thin and then cut into a leaf form using scissors. The berry is also made from resin clay. The stems and vines are made from a plastic bar which is heated and then stretched.

Students will make the board from stone powder clay, a new medium at school; first forming the board and then when it dries, polishing it with sandpaper. With acrylic paint, they will draw the faux wood grain, add oil stain, and finish with a varnish. These techniques are a little difficult, but very useful. The pot by Hiroyuki is included to present a finished product.

time: 12 hours. Completion is likely if students work overtime on their own outside of the classroom.

POWER TOOLS: None

SKILL LEVEL: All levels

MATERIALS FEE: $35 to be collected at school

INSTRUCTOR: Iulia Chin Lee, Artisan
COURSE: Wood-Turning and Bowl-Hollowing
PROJECT: Nesting Bowls

Nesting bowls, as the name suggests, are a series of bowls which can be set or “nested” within each other in order from smallest to largest, with each bowl fitting precisely inside the one prior with little to no gaps.

This class will focus on two basic bowl-hollowing techniques, with an emphasis on precise fitting. Beginners should be able to turn a set of four bowls, while more advanced students will be able to make as many as they like within the time frame. This course is a comprehensive introduction to basic techniques of bowl-hollowing in wood and is ideal for beginners.

time: 12 hours. Completion is likely.

POWER TOOLS: lathe

SKILL LEVEL: Beginner and intermediate

MATERIALS FEE: $25 to be collected at school. Those who do not have turning tools may purchase them from the instructor. The high quality Sorby turning tool set is $150.

INSTRUCTOR: Deb Mackie, Artisan
COURSE: Leather Crafting
PROJECT: Tooled Leather Rocking Chair

Among the treasures in Grandma’s attic was a beautiful wooden rocking chair with a ruined cane seat and back. Caning chairs is an art form in itself and a tedious process this instructor has no desire to learn! Apparently, she is not alone in this thinking, which is why many of these beloved antiques are often found with new seats and backs made from fabric, carpet, wood, and even leather. My attic find is still waiting for its new seat and back, but it inspired this very project.

Starting with a 1:12 scale wooden rocking chair made specially for this class by IGMA Artisan Bill Studebaker, students will learn to craft tooled leather panels for the seat and back of the chair. Students can follow the supplied tooling pattern or design their own using the instructor’s large collection of leather stamps. Various techniques will be taught, such as tooling, embossing, faux stitching and skiving (thinning the leather). Students can choose from several colors of leather dye to complete their own customized chair.

time: 12 hours. Completion is likely.

POWER TOOLS: None.

SKILL LEVEL: All levels. This is a fun, laid-back and easy class, for all skill levels. No leather experience necessary!

MATERIALS FEE: $125 to be collected at school. All materials will be provided, including the wooden rocking chair. Specialized leather tools will be available for use during class, and available for students to purchase if they wish to keep them. A list of other basic tools will be available for students to acquire before class.

INSTRUCTOR: Chris Malcomson, Artisan
COURSE: Furniture Construction/Marquetry
PROJECT: Victorian Sewing Box, circa 1860

This beautiful sewing box dates from the high point of Victorian design. It is made with myrtle and ebony with fine marquetry at its center. Students will first make the dovetailed box and then learn how to veneer and make decorative bandings before moving onto the handmade marquetry panel.

time: 12 hours. Completion is likely.

POWER TOOLS: scroll saw, flex shaft, drill press

SKILL LEVEL: All levels. This workshop is suitable for anyone with a good eye for detail and lots of enthusiasm.

MATERIALS FEE: $30 to be collected at school

INSTRUCTOR: Marcia McClain, Artisan
COURSE: Textiles
PROJECT: Double Window Treatment

This window treatment, inspired by an ad for custom draperies, combines traditional and contemporary decorating methods for a very pleasing look in one twelfth scale. Students will learn to handle multiple layers of fabrics without a heavy look to the finished project. They will learn the use of multiple trims to finish edges with design appeal. How to use different fabrics in various prints and colors will also be discussed. This treatment has all the essential design elements of Federal and Victorian eras in its design. With a change in fabric choice the student will be able to make a window treatment appropriate to a wide range of historical periods. The treatment may be adapted to a single window if the student wishes.

time: 12 hours. Completion is likely.

POWER TOOLS: None

SKILL LEVEL: Beginner. Simple sewing experience will help in handling fabrics comfortably.

MATERIALS FEE: $25 to be collected at school

INSTRUCTOR: Cristina Minischetti, Fellow
COURSE: Polymer Clay Food
PROJECT: Drinks and Appetizers

It looks like the cocktail party has started; learn how to make a Martini, Margarita, Cuba Libre and more. Don't forget to serve them with some appetizers, such as canapés with salmon, shrimp, eggs, caviar, cheese and olives.

Making these items students will learn how to use polymer clays with advanced techniques such as sculpting and creating different textures; simple and intermediate caning techniques; use of liquid clay as a decorating medium; coloring with chalks and acrylic paint; and the use of epoxy resin to simulate liquids. The techniques and skills learned can be used in other miniature food projects.

Please note that the drinks decorations (citrus slices and olives on skewer) are not part of the class but will be provided by the teacher ready to use. The teacher will provide some tools together with all the accessories used in the project and highly detailed written directions to keep for future reference.

time: 12 hours. Completion is likely. Students unable to finish the project will have the necessary information to complete it on their own.

POWER TOOLS: None.

SKILL LEVEL: Intermediate and advanced

MATERIALS FEE: $75 to be collected at school. There is an optional fee of $12 for the wooden tray with handles.

INSTRUCTOR: Cristina Minischetti, Fellow
COURSE: Polymer Clay Food
PROJECT: Birthday Party

It’s time to celebrate a birthday with a colorful selection of sweets that can also be used individually for different projects. The set is made up of an iced layered cake decorated with multicolor confetti, lollipops, all sorts of licorice and a jug filled with lemonade.

Making these items students will learn how to use polymer clays with advanced techniques such as sculpting and creating different textures; simple and intermediate caning techniques; use of liquid clay as a decorating medium; and the use of epoxy resin to simulate liquids. The techniques and skills learned can be used in other miniature food projects. The teacher will provide some tools together with all the accessories used in the project and highly detailed written directions to keep for future reference.

time: 12 hours. Completion is likely. Students unable to finish the project will have the necessary information to complete it on their own.

POWER TOOLS: None

SKILL LEVEL: Intermediate and advanced

MATERIALS FEE: $60 to be collected at school

INSTRUCTOR: Mary Grady O’Brien, Fellow
COURSE: Folk Art Painting
PROJECT: Hanging Decorated Spice Box

In the United States we have a wealth of art projects referred to as “folk art.” The aim was to create beauty with simple honesty. This lovely little piece provides useful purpose while adding a touch of color to the home. Given its construction with tiny drawers, it would be possible to assume it was used to store salt along with spices.

The very colorful and pleasing pattern features birds, roses and tiny sprigs on the small drawers.

It promises to be a satisfying project for all levels. Students will be working with oil paints and there will be ample discussion and instruction about how to repair mistakes and develop more control with this very flexible medium. The instructor’s philosophy is “mistakes will happen, let's have some skills to fix them.” She likes to encourage learning without stress.

time: 12 hours. Completion is likely.

POWER TOOLS: None

SKILL LEVEL: All levels are welcome.

MATERIALS FEE: $85 to be collected at school. All materials are provided by the instructor.

INSTRUCTOR: Pat Richards, Fellow
COURSE: Mixed Media
PROJECT: Bergere Hat with Trim and Storage Box

The bergere hat was popular during several periods of history and examples can be seen in many paintings of stylish 18th century women. The bergere, or shepherdess, hat incorporated a very wide, flat brim, a low crown, and was generally made of straw and decorated simply or extravagantly with ribbons, flowers and/or feathers. 

Students will construct the basic shape by coiling and gluing together a narrow straw trim and will then decorate their finished hats as desired with pictures and samples to refer to for inspiration. Time permitting, students will then create a band box in which to store their finished hat.

time: 36 hours. 12 hours. Completion is likely.

POWER TOOLS: None.

SKILL LEVEL: Beginner

MATERIALS FEE: $25 to be collected at school

INSTRUCTOR: Kim Stewart, Artisan
COURSE: Wicker Furniture Construction
PROJECT: Wicker Arm Chair

Wicker furniture has been sitting on porches for centuries. What really is “wicker furniture”? The word wicker is used to describe any woven furniture (or basket) that is made with pliable materials. This lovely “cottage style” wicker arm chair will be created by weaving waxed linen thread over paper-covered wires.

Students will prepare the pre-cut wood base by drilling the holes that will support the wire spokes and next, they will paint the base and wires if they choose. Emphasis will be placed on the weaving and shaping of the chair together with incorporating the diamond pattern into the chair back. Students will make a braid trim which will be applied to the arm roll edge. The chair legs are wrapped with cord and set into small brass colored caps to finish the feet.

Students may choose a fabric provided by the instructor for the upholstered seat cushion or they may wish to bring their own 100% cotton fabric.

time: 12 hours. Completion is likely.

POWER TOOLS: drill press

SKILL LEVEL: All levels. Good eye-hand coordination is a must along with a little patience.

MATERIALS FEE: $40 to be collected at school

INSTRUCTOR: Lidi Stroud, Artisan
COURSE: Basketry
PROJECT: Woven Bottle

Using a bottle provided by the instructor and three-ply waxed linen thread, the students will learn how to weave a round base; weave the body of the bottle using twining and 3 and 4 rod whale; work a rolled border; and construct the handles.

time: 12 hours. Completion is likely.

POWER TOOLS: None.

SKILL LEVEL: Beginner. There is no need for any weaving experience with this project, but attention to detail and excellent hand-eye co-ordination are high in demand.

MATERIALS FEE: $20 to be collected at school